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Published: Jun 17, 2019 12:14:35 AM
Moz provides inbound marketing analytics software. They also foster the most vibrant online marketing community and create free resources for learning inbound marketing.
  • Jun 17, 2019 12:05:00 AM

    Posted by TheMozTeam

    In August 2017, a Think With Google piece stated that local searches without “near me” had grown by 150 percent and that searchers were beginning to drop other geo-modifiers — like zip codes and neighborhoods — from their local queries as well.

    Since we can’t always rely on searchers to state when their intent is local, we should be looking at keywords where that intent is implied. But, before we start optimizing, we need to know whether Google is any good at interpreting implicit local intent and if it’s treated the same as explicit intent.

    Consider these queries: [sushi near me] would indicate that close proximity is essential; [sushi in Vancouver] seems to cast a city-wide net; while [sushi] is largely ambiguous — are they hungry for general info or actual sushi? And what happens with [best sushi], where quality could take priority over proximity? Google decides what these queries mean, so it’s important for us to understand those decisions.

    In this whitepaper, we put local packs under the microscope to determine:

    • How Google interprets different kinds of local intent.
    • How geo-location and geo-modification influence local packs and organic results.
    • How distance, Google ratings, and organic rank shape a local pack.
    • How Google handles competing needs.

    Plus, we’ll make the case for tracking local and show you how to set up your own local tracking strategy.

    Download the whitepaper


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  • Jun 14, 2019 12:04:00 AM

    Posted by BenjaminEstes

    We've all agreed that technical SEO is integral, and many of us know at least a little bit about the subject if we're not already practitioners. But have you considered that the way you think about technical SEO could be hindering or helping your success? Today, Ben Estes from Distilled shares the agency's tried-and-true framework for tackling technical SEO quandaries strategically.


    Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab!

    Video Transcription

    Hi. Welcome to another Whiteboard Friday. My name is Ben, and I'm a principal consultant at a company called Distilled. Today I'd like to talk to you about how we think about technical SEO at Distilled. Now, technical SEO is something that a lot of people know a lot of stuff about.

    You accumulate knowledge over time from a lot of different sources, and that's where a lot of the value that we deliver comes from. But not everyone can think about technical SEO from a strategic perspective, and that's the skill that I think we should talk more about. 

    Framing the problem

    Let's start by framing the problem. So look at these charts. Now, I would argue that most people's mental model of technical SEO matches this first chart.

    So in this chart, the solid black line is the actual traffic that you're getting, whereas the dotted line is the hypothetical traffic you could be getting if all of the technical problems on your site were resolved. So some people see this and say, "Well, you know, if I can just keep fixing technical things, I can keep getting more traffic to my site."

    That's one way of looking at it, but I would argue that it's not the best way of looking at it, because really there are only so many technical things that can go wrong with your site. There's a finite number of problems. It's not an opportunity so much as an issue that needs to be resolved. So what I try and encourage my clients and colleagues to do is think about it in this way.

    So it's the same chart and the same situation. Here's the actual traffic that you're getting and the hypothetical traffic you could be getting. But really what's happening is your technical problems are keeping you from realizing the most potential traffic that you could be capturing. In other words, there are technical issues preventing us from capturing all the traffic that we could. Now, once you've framed the problem in this way, how do you solve it?

    So some people just say, "Well, I've got this big problem. I need to understand how all the things that could be wrong with this site. I'm just going to dive in. I'm going to go through page by page, and I'll finish when either I run out of pages or more realistically I run out of time or I run out of the client's budget. So what if there's a better way to actually solve that problem and know that it's been solved?

    Well, that's what this framework that I'm going to present to you is about. The way that we would recommend doing that is by taking the big problem, the overall problem of technical SEO and breaking it down into subproblems and breaking those down again until you have problems that are so small that they are trivially solvable. Now, I'm going to explain to you exactly how we accomplish that, and it's going to be a little bit abstract.

    The approach

    So if you want something concrete to follow along with, I'd recommend checking out the blog post at this URL. That's dis.tl/tech-audit. Okay. So when you have a big problem that you're trying to break down, many people's first attempt winds up looking something like this Venn diagram. So we take one problem, break it down into three subproblems, but there's some sort of overlap between those problems.

    Once there's overlap, you lose a lot of confidence. There is, are you duplicating effort across these different areas? Or did you miss something because these two things are kind of the same? Everything just gets a little hazy very quickly. So to get past that, what I've used at Distilled is this consulting concept called MECE.

    Mutually exclusive and comprehensively exhaustive

    MECE stands for mutually exclusive and comprehensively exhaustive. That's a lot of fancy words, so I'll show you pictorially what I mean. So instead of having a Venn diagram like this, what if each of the problems was completely independent? Now they still cover the same area. There's just no overlap between them, and that's what MECE means.

    Because there is no overlap between them, they are mutually exclusive. Because they cover all of the original problem, they're comprehensively exhaustive. So what does this mean in technical SEO specifically? Now remember the problem that we're dealing with is that there are technical issues preventing us from capturing traffic that we would otherwise be able to. So what are the three ways that that could happen? 

    1. Maybe our content isn't being indexed. There's a technical reason our content isn't being indexed. 
    2. Our content doesn't rank as well as it could, and therefore we're losing this traffic. 
    3. There is a technical reason our content isn't being presented as well as it could be in the SERPs.

    This is things like having rich snippets, stars, things like that that could increase click-through rate. These things seem kind of trivial, but actually all of the technical problems that you can find on your site contribute to one or more of these three categories. So again, that was pretty abstract. So let's talk about an example of how that actually plays out. This is actually the first technical check in this audit at that blog post.

    An example

    So, for instance, we're starting by considering there is a technical reason our content isn't being indexed. Well, what are all the ways that that could happen? One of the ways is that URLs are not discoverable by crawlers, and, again, that is a whole thing in itself that can be broken down further.

    So maybe it's that our XML sitemaps aren't uploaded to Google Search Console. Of course, this isn't a guarantee that we have a problem. But if there's a problem down here, there's a pretty good chance that that trickles back up to a problem up here that we're really concerned about. The beauty of this isn't just that it winds up helping us create a checklist so that we know all of the technical issues we ought to be looking at.

    

    But it also helps us convey exactly what the meaning is of our findings and why people should care about them. So this is the template that I encourage my colleagues to use at Distilled. "We are seeing ________. This is a problem because something.You should care about that because something else." The way this works is like Mad Lib style, except we work like inside out.

    So we start with this point here. We are seeing that our XML sitemaps aren't uploaded to Google Search Console. This is a problem because maybe URLs are not discoverable by crawlers. We should care about that because there is a technical reason our content isn't being indexed, and that right there is exactly the message that you deliver to your client.

    So again, this is exactly the framework that we use for our technical audits at Distilled. It's given us a lot more confidence. It's given us a lot more insight into how long this process should take for our analysts and consultants, and it's also got us better outcomes particularly because it's helped us communicate better about what we found. Thank you very much. I would love if more people use this, and feel free to reach out to me personally if you have any thoughts or questions.

    Thank you.

    Video transcription by Speechpad.com


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  • Jun 13, 2019 12:05:00 AM

    Posted by allen.yesilevich

    Link building is all about creating strong, reputable relationships online — but what if you took offline strategies and applied it to building your brand online? No matter the size of your company, hosting, speaking at, or attending an event is a valuable tool for bulking up your backlinks while giving your brand industry exposure.

    Every stage of the event process, from promotion and beyond, provides valuable opportunities for acquiring backlinks. The trick is to apply the correct strategy. Whether you’re sharing your event on an event listing site, reaching out to influencers to spread the word, or publishing event-specific content, leveraging your face-to-face marketing efforts to gain more backlinks will help your business — no matter its size — become more visible.

    Prior to the Event

    Before you set out on your link-building journey, you need to establish what pages and domains you want others to share. For an event, a dedicated landing page on your website that lists key details and invites people to register is the best place to drive potential attendees. It's also easy to share for promotion.

    Event sites

    Once you have your pages and domains set up, you can take that page to event listing sites, which offer easy link opportunities. The location of your event will determine where you choose to post. For instance, if you’re hosting a small event, region-specific event sites will earn you links that increase your visibility in local search results. 

    If you’re hosting a larger event with a national or global draw, Eventful or Meetup are two sites that will link out directly to your event page. As an added bonus, some larger sites will get scraped by other sources, meaning you could potentially get multiple links from one post.

    Connect with influencers

    Connecting with bloggers in your industry and asking them to share your event details with their followers is another way to gain links. 

    Before you reach out, do some research to see what types of bloggers and influencers are best suited for this; you want to make sure the backlinks you receive are valuable, from credible sites that will help you build authority and enhance your organic search visibility. While it may be more difficult to obtain links from the experts in your industry who have higher domain authorities, they'll be the most beneficial for brand building.

    Once you establish your list of target industry bloggers, reach out and explain why your event is relevant to their audience and why sharing or posting about it would add value to their content. 

    A big mistake people often make is expecting content without contributing anything in return. Would you show up to a potluck without a dish and eat all of the food? Consider offering an incentive, like an opportunity for cross-site promotion so that the partnership isn’t just transactional, but mutually beneficial. Not only will this help you acquire a new link, but it will also help you get more exposure to people in your target market that you may not have been able to reach previously.

    During the Event

    Whether your company is hosting an event or someone from your team is speaking at one, there are many opportunities to support your site’s link building efforts. Attendees can have a positive effect on your organization’s backlink profile. As the old saying goes, if you didn't post about it, were you even there? Professionals and brands alike love sharing thought leadership insights and event recaps in the form of blogs and social posts. When they do, there's a good chance they'll be sharing a link to your company's site.

    Write about it

    Even if you’re only attending an event, there are link building opportunities to take advantage of. Post daily blogs highlighting the key takeaways from that day's sessions or share your take on a memorable keynote. Event-specific content has a good chance of making its way to and being shared by the speakers, event host, other attendees, and your team back at the office.

    "Consider offering an incentive, like an opportunity for cross-site promotion so that the partnership isn’t just transactional, but mutually beneficial."

    To increase your chances of getting your content out in front of the right people, share it in a quick email or LinkedIn message to a presenter or marketing lead from the company hosting the event. Of course, you should always share your post on your own and your company’s social media channels and tag the relevant players. The hope is that, by being included and getting free publicity, these high-quality sources will feel inclined to share your content

    Network, network, network

    While posting about events can help you get links, you should also focus on building long-term relationships with other leaders in your industry. There is no better time to do this than when at an event. In fact, 81 percent of event-goers say they attend events for networking opportunities. If you're networking, you can set yourself up well to establish future linking partnerships with sites in similar or complementing industries.

    After the Event

    You can still acquire backlinks from your offline event after you’ve headed back to work. Some of the best link building opportunities have yet to come.

    Follow up with email

    If you spoke at an event, you can nurture the people who attended your session through email and send them relevant information. Setting up a landing page on your site with downloadable slides from your presentation can easily be shared and linked. If they haven't done so already, see if your contacts are willing to share their event experience on their blog and social pages. This will give you crowdsourced content with valuable backlinks.

    Track your efforts

    It's important to track your backlinks using social listening tools after the event. If you feel the linking sites could offer synergies, either for content or business purposes, reach out to discuss mutually-beneficial partnerships.

    Remember, all the hard work you put in now will pay off in the future, too. Consistently acquiring backlinks has a snowball effect and will increase both your ranking positioning and attendee turnout for future events.

    Wrapping up

    One of the best link-building strategies you can leverage is your real-life relationships. What are some ways you've transformed an in-life connection into a valuable, digital backlink? 


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  • Jun 12, 2019 12:05:00 AM

    Posted by TheMozTeam


    This blog post was originally published on the STAT blog.


    We asked SEO Analyst, Emily Christon of Ovative Group, to share how her team makes keyword rank reporting easy and digestible for all stakeholders. Read on to see how she combines the power of STAT with Google Data Studio for streamlined reporting that never fails to impress her clients.

    Why Google Data Studio

    Creating reports for your clients is a vital part of SEO. It’s also one of the most daunting and time-consuming tasks. Your reports need to contain all the necessary data, while also having clear visuals, providing quick wins, and being easy to understand.

    At Ovative Group, we’re big advocates for reporting tools that save time and make data easier to understand. This is why we love Google Data Studio.

    This reporting tool was created with the user in mind and allows for easy collaboration and sharing with teams. It’s also free, and its reporting dashboard is designed to take the complexity and stress out of visualizing data.

    Don’t get us wrong. We still love our spreadsheets, but tools like Excel aren’t ideal for building interactive dashboards. They also don’t allow for easy data pulls — you have to manually add your data, which can eat up a lot of time and cause a lot of feelings.

    Data Studio, however, pulls all your data into one place from multiple sources, like spreadsheets, Google Analytics accounts, and Adwords. You can then customize how all that data is viewed so you can surface quick insights.

    How does this relate to keyword reporting?

    Creating an actionable keyword report that is beneficial for both SEO and your stakeholders can be a challenge. Data Studio makes things a bit easier for us at Ovative in a variety of ways:

    Automated data integration

    Our team uses the STAT API — which can be connected to Data Studio through a little technical magic and Google Big Query — to pull in all our raw data. You can select what data points you want to be collected from the API, including rank, base rank, competitors, search volume, local information, and more.

    Once your data is collected and living in Big Query, you can access it through the Data Studio interface. If you want to learn more about STAT’s API, go here.

    Customization

    Do you care about current rank? Rank over time? Major movers – those that changed +20 positions week over week? Or are you just after how many keywords you have ranking number one?

    All of this is doable — and easy — once you’re comfortable in Data Studio. You can easily customize your reports to match your goals.

    “Our team uses the STAT API — which can be connected to Data Studio through a little technical magic and Google Big Query — to pull in all our raw data.” — Emily Christon, SEO Analyst at Ovative Group

    Custom dashboards make reporting and insights efficient and client-facing, transforming all that raw data into easy-to-understand metrics, which tell a more compelling story.

    How to build your custom Google Data Studio 

    There are a myriad of ways to leverage Google Data Studio for major insights. Here are just a few features we use to help visualize our data.

    Keyword rank

    This report gives you a snapshot of how many keywords you have in each ranking group and how things are trending. You can also scroll through your list of keywords to see what the traffic-driving queries are.

    One cool feature of Data Studio when it comes to rank is period over period comparisons. For example, if you set the date range to the previous week, it will automatically pull week over week rank change. If you set the date range to the previous month, it pulls a month over month rank change.

    At Ovative, we do weekly, monthly, and yearly keyword rank change reporting.

    Keyword look-up tool

    If you notice that traffic has declined in a specific keyword set, pop down to the keyword look-up tool to track rank trends over time. This view is extremely helpful — it shows the progress or decline of rank to help explain traffic variability.

    Campaign or priority tracker

    To support newly launched pages or priority keywords, create a separate section just for these keywords. This will make it easy for you to quickly check the performance and trends of chosen keyword sets.

    What's next? 

    Google Data Studio is only as powerful as you make it.

    The STAT API integration in Google Data Studio represents one page of our typical client’s reporting studio; we make sure to add in a page for top-level KPI trends, a page for Search Console keyword performance, and other relevant sources for ease of use for ourselves and the client.

    Want more? 

    Want to dive deeper into STAT? Got questions about our API? You can book a demo with us and get a personalized walk through. 

    You can also chat with our rad team at MozCon this July 15–17 to see how you can go seriously deep with your data. Ask about our specialty API — two additional services to give you everything a 100-result SERP has to offer, and perfect if you’ve built your own connector.

    Grab my MozCon ticket now!


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  • Jun 11, 2019 12:05:00 AM

    Posted by willcritchlow

    There’s a lot of material out there, on this site and others, about the importance of link-building. Normally, its effectiveness is either taken for granted or viewed as implied by ranking factor studies — the latter of which doesn't necessarily show that correlated factors actually drive performance. The real picture is one in which links clearly remain important, but where their role is nuanced.

    For a while now, I’ve wanted to dig a little deeper into an individual link-building campaign that takes place over a relatively short period of time. I wanted to see what results (besides just link-based metrics) could be attributed to it.

    In this post, I will try to pin down the effects that came from the campaign and show that yes, getting a bunch of links from the success of some highly visible “big content’ can drive improved rankings

    The reason you don’t see more posts like this one is noisy data — so much goes on with a website’s performance that it can be difficult to draw a hard and fast connection between a campaign and its results for a business’s bottom line. This is especially true for link-building, for three reasons:

    • Websites are naturally accruing links anyway — both the target of the campaign and their competitors
    • To some extent, we anticipate a domain-wide effect, which will as such be proportionately small and hard to pin down vs. noise from the algorithm and competitor activity
    • Links do not have such a step-change impact as technical fixes or creation of new landing pages

    However, at Distilled we recently had an opportunity with a particularly strong piece on a niche site to analyze a situation where the impact of our work ought to be more clearly visible among the broader noise. Take a look at these graphs, which show the linking-root domain acquisition of a client of ours over the last two years, as measured by Majestic and Ahrefs respectively:

    See what I mean about noise? And I’m saying this is an unusually clear cut case. We actually built nine creative pieces, with link acquisition as one of the goals, for this client, over a two-year period. We’ve talked before about the campaign as a whole, here. There’s one that stands out in both graphs, though which is the one that launched in March 2018.

    This gives us a rare, valuable opportunity to see which other metrics, which might have more direct business value, had noticeable changes around that time.

    What might we expect to happen?

    The theory is simple: Links remain part of Google’s algorithm, and so more links to a site mean better rankings. However, the reality is more complex — in our experience, creative pieces as link-building assets tend to result in two types of links:

    • Links to the creative piece, which in turn links, typically, to the site’s homepage
    • Links directly to the homepage of the client site — e.g. “Research by client (client.com) indicates that…”

    The interesting thing here is that for many sites, the homepage is not a core landing page. I’ve written before about how it’s almost impossible to have a good mental model for internal link equity flow, which makes the actual impact of the piece on core pages almost certainly not zero, but otherwise hard to predict. On the same subject, I’d also recommend this video by Dixon Jones at Majestic.

    In a similar vein, we also know that the complexities of PageRank are themselves only a part of the unknowable complexities of Google’s ranking algorithm, meaning we can’t guarantee that adding links always moves the needle. I recently recorded this Whiteboard Friday where I mention some recent research by my colleague Tom Capper, which shows how unpredictable these effects can be.

    The particular client example I’ve been referring to in this post had two things going for it which, again, brought unusual clarity to these effects:

    1. The homepage was, in fact, a core ranking URL
    2. It was struggling to make its way onto page 1 for many reasonable target terms

    Both of these ought to make it an ideal candidate for clearcut benefits from high-quality link building. (This isn’t to say link-building cannot work if these criteria are not met — just that the results will be harder to analyze!)

    1st order results

    Precisely because of the difficulty in analysis mentioned above, we find clients normally prefer to assess the performance of link-building campaigns in terms of 1st order benefits — by which I mean the performance of the actual creative piece, rather than their commercial landing pages.

    The particular piece that stands out in those link acquisition graphs above earned the following 1st order benefits (and I’ve included graphs from our internal tracking platform so you can get a feel for the pace of acquisition):

    228 LRDs peak (204 “fresh” index shown below), of which ~145 within a month of launch:

    2,140 Facebook shares at the peak, of which ~1,750 within a month of launch:

    82,584 landings in Google Analytics, of which ~67,000 within a month of launch:

    I mentioned above that not all links tend to be directed at the piece itself, with journalists instead often referencing the homepage. 145 (domain-unique) links were directed at this piece by mid-April, but you’ll notice that March beat an average month by ~200 LRDs, and April also outperformed by ~100. By my back-of-the-envelope maths, you might want to claim as many as 300 LRDs driven to the whole domain by this piece, but your opinion may differ!

    Showing the ways it worked

    Right, I did say I’d link this at least to rankings, didn’t I?

    Remember: This was part of a campaign of 9 pieces, and it launched mid-March, with most 1st order metrics, or leading indicators, coming through within a month (and no major technical changes around this time). There is some signal in among the noise here. Check out this graph, showing the number of keywords ranked for, according to Ahrefs:

    Notice that change in gradient after the launch? (And, for the cynics among you, the piece itself only ranks for 20 keywords itself according to this same data source — that wasn’t a primary goal with this content).

    Here are the rankings for the client’s (fairly ambitious!) target keywords:

    I’d particularly draw your attention to the movement from the “11–20” to “4–10” group, which is consistent with the research by my colleague Tom Capper that I mentioned above. (Sidenote: it was nice to see the client’s Domain Authority increase relative to their competitive set in the recent update. The improvements to DA, aimed at making it better at predicting ranking ability, appear to have worked in this sample-size-one case!).

    You can see this pattern more clearly in this graph, which we presented to the client when the campaign concluded late last year:

    This effect is surprisingly clear-cut, but it might well be that to continue moving up the SERP, from positions 4–10 to positions 1–3, a very different type of work is needed — perhaps one emphasizing brand, or intent matching.

    How can I do this for my site/client?

    Here are some useful resources to help when starting on your creative campaigns:

    Mark - How to make sticky content

    Hannah - What is content strategy

    Leonie - How to make award winning creative content - Part 1

    Leonie - How to make award winning creative content - Part 2

    Conclusion: Big content for links can work

    As I mentioned above, it’s surprisingly unusual to see such a clear and obvious case of link-building work moving rankings in a lasting way. This has certain similarities with other such cases we’ve seen in recent years, though:

    • The site started fairly small (if nothing else, this makes the signal bigger relative to the noise)
    • It had target terms that were on the cusp of first-page rankings
    • Some search competitors had far stronger domains

    The reports that “links are dead” have, apparently, been greatly exaggerated — instead, it’s just that the picture has gotten more complex.

    Obviously Distilled clients are only a finite sample, however, so I’d love to hear your experiences of successful link-building, and, crucially, the kind of situations in which they moved rankings, in the comments below!




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  • Jun 10, 2019 12:04:00 AM

    Posted by Cyrus-Shepard

    At Moz, we know the value of premium SEO tools — we've built new tools for 10+ years. Paid tools are hugely valuable in SEO when you need advanced features, increased limits, stored data, or online support.

    But for 70 percent of other tasks, a free tool often does the trick.

    There are literally hundreds of free SEO tools out there, so we want to focus on only the best and most useful to add to your toolbox. Tons of people in the SEO community helped vet the SEO software in this post (see the note at the end). To be included, a tool had to meet three requirements. It must be:

    1. Widely used by the SEO community
    2. Offers above-board value + actionable data
    3. Actually, truly free

    The tools are categorized by SEO function. Click on a button below to jump to that specific section.

    Categories:

    Analytics   Crawling/Indexing   Keyword Research   Link Tools   Local SEO   Mobile SEO   Multi-tool   On-page SEO   Research   Site Speed   Wordpress


    Analytics

    The best tools to analyze search performance, monitor SERPs, keywords, and competitor analysis:

    1. Bing Webmaster Tools

    While Google Webmaster Tools gets all the glory, folks forget that Bing Webmaster offers a full suite of website and search analytics. Especially useful are keyword reports, keyword research, and crawling data.

    Get it: Bing Webmaster
    Also useful: Yandex.Webmaster

    2. Data Studio

    If you need to merge data from different sources (say Search Console and Google Analytics), visualize, and share it - this is Google Data Studio's comfort zone. For an idea of all the SEO tasks and dashboards that you can build for free, check out these Google Data Studio Resources from Lee Hurst.

    Get it: Data Studio

    3. Enhanced Google Analytics Annotations

    How do you know if your dip in traffic (or rise) is associated with a Google Algorithm update, or perhaps a major holiday? This is a highly-recommended Google Chrome plugin that overlays additional data on top of your analytics, so you can easily send screenshots to clients showing exactly how outside forces impacted traffic.

    Get it: Enhanced Google Analytics Annotations
    Alternatives: Panguin Tool, Zeo Tools

    4. Google Analytics

    The big kahuna, and the most widely-used web analytics package on earth. For being free, Google Analytics is surprisingly robust and plays well with other Google products, including Optimize, Search Console, and Data Studio. Some folks have privacy concerns with GA — though Google swears they don't use this data for search rankings.

    Get it: Google Analytics
    Alternatives: Clicky, Open Web Analytics

    5. Search Console

    Probably the most useful free SEO tool on this entire list, it's hard to imagine doing modern SEO without access to the data inside Google's Search Console. This is the most reliable location for information on how Google crawls and ranks your site, and is one of the only places where you can get reliable keyword data.

    Get it: Search Console

    6. Keyword Hero

    Did somebody say (not provided)? Keyword Hero works to solve the problem of missing keyword data with lots of advanced math and machine learning. It's not a perfect system, but for those struggling to match keywords with conversion and other on-site metrics, the data can be a valuable step in the right direction. Pricing is free up to 2000 sessions/month.

    Get it: Keyword Hero

    7. MozCast

    The brainchild of Dr. Pete and the original Google SERP tracker, MozCast is the go-to algorithm tracker whenever there's a big update, or not. Also useful are the SERP tracking features showing the prominence of such features as ads and knowledge panels.

    Get it: MozCast
    Also useful: Algoroo, Rank Risk Index, Ayima Pulse


    Crawling/Indexing

    Specific tools to make sure your site is crawlable and optimized.

    8. Beam Us Up

    If you need a free, desktop crawler, you can't do better than Beam Us Up. While it doesn't have as many features as Screaming Frog, it does offer 100 percent free crawling with no limits. Windows only.

    Get it: Beam Us Up

    9. Link Redirect Trace

    A free Chrome extension, lots of SEOs recommend Link Redirect Trace as the "all-in-one redirect path analyzer." The extension reveals information about HTTP headers, rel-canonicals, robots.txt, and basic link metrics from LinkResearchTools. The "Save Screenshot" feature is super useful too.

    Get it: Link Redirect Trace

    10. Redirect Path

    Similar to Link Redirect Trace, Redirect Path is a nifty tool from the good folks at Ayima that shows redirect paths and header information for every URL you visit. Gotta admit, I've used this extension for years and it's almost "always on" in my browser.

    Get it: Redirect Path

    11. Screaming Frog

    Aside from having one of the best Twitter accounts of any SEO tool maker, Screaming Frog is the most popular desktop-based crawler available today. Many people don't realize that there's a free version that allows for up to 500 URLs per crawl. While not as fully functional as the paid version, it's great for small projects and smaller site audits.

    Get it: Screaming Frog

    12. Screaming Frog Log File Analyzer

    Most folks in the SEO space are familiar with Screaming Frog, but many don't realize that the Frog also offers a standalone free/paid Log File Analyzer tool. The free version is very robust, though limited to 1000 lines.

    Get it: Screaming Frog Log File Analyser

    13. SEOlyzer

    SEOlyzer is a log analysis tool recommended by Aleyda Solis in her very excellent SEO podcast Crawling Mondays. SEOlyzer is a terrific log analysis tool with some cool features like real-time analysis and page categorization.

    Get it: SEOlyzer

    14. Xenu

    Gotta be honest, although Xenu has been on every "free SEO tool" list since the dawn of, no way did I think it would make this one. This Windows-based desktop crawler has been virtually unchanged over the past 10 years. That said, a lot of folks still love and use it for basic site auditing, looking for broken links, etc. Heck, I'm leaving here for sentimental reasons. Check it out.

    Get it: Xenu


    Keyword Research

    15. Answer The Public

    It's hard not to love Answer The Public. The interface has an almost "Cards Against Humanity" rebel vibe to it. Regardless, if you want to generate a massive list of questions from any keyword set, this is your go-to tool.

    Get it: Answer The Public

    16. Keyword Explorer

    OMG. 500 million keyword suggestions, all the most accurate volume ranges in the industry. You also get Moz's famous Keyword Difficulty Score along with CTR data. Moz's free community account gives you access to 10 queries a month, with each query literally giving you up to 1000 keyword suggestions along with SERP analysis.

    Get it: Keyword Explorer

    17. Keyword Planner

    Google's own Keyword Planner was built for folks who buy Google ads, but it still delivers a ton of information useful for SEO keyword planning. It uses Google's own data and has useful functions like country filtering. Be careful with metrics like competition (this is meant for paid placements) and volume — which is known to be confusing.

    Get it: Keyword Planner

    18. Keyword Shitter

    Yes, it's called Keyword Shitter. It pains me to write this. That said, it says what it does and does what it says. Type in a keyword and it, um, poops out a poop-ton of keywords.

    Get it: Keyword Shitter

    19. Keywords Everywhere

    An SEO favorite! Install this browser extension for Firefox or Chrome, and see keyword suggestions with volume as you cruise the internet. Works in Google Search Console as well. This one is a must-have for keyword inspiration.

    Get it: Keywords Everywhere

    20. Ubersuggest

    Sometimes I make fun of Neil Patel because he does SEO in his pajamas. I'm probably jealous because I don't even own pajamas. Regardless, Neil took over Ubersuggest not long ago and gave it a major overall. If you haven't tried it in a while, it now goes way beyond keyword suggestions and offers a lot of extended SEO capabilities such as basic link metrics and top competitor pages.

    Get it: Ubersuggest


    Link Tools

    Tools to find, evaluate, and process backlink opportunities.

    21. Disavow Tool

    Google makes the Disavow Tool hard to find because most site owners usually don't need to use it. But when you do, it can be useful for getting penalties removed and some SEOs swear by it for fighting off negative SEO. If you choose to use this tool, be careful and check with this guide on disavowing the right links.

    Get it: Disavow Tool

    22. Link Explorer

    Link Explorer is arguably the biggest, most accurate link index in the SEO world today, boasting 35 trillion links. The free account access gives you 10 queries and 50 rows of data per query every month, plus adds basic link metrics to the MozBar as you browse the web.

    Get it: Link Explorer

    23. Link Miner

    Link Miner is a free Chrome extension developed by Jon Cooper, one of the masters of link building. Use it to quickly find broken links on each page, as well as see basic link metrics as you search Google. Simple, easy, and useful.

    Get it: Link Miner


    Local SEO

    Free tools to optimize your on Google Maps and beyond.

    24. Google My Business

    Basically, this is the #1, must-have tool for Local SEO — especially if you live in a market served by Google. It allows you to claim your business, manage listing information, and respond to reviews — among other things. Claiming your business profile forms the foundation of most other local SEO activities, so it's an essential step.

    Get it: Google My Business

    25. Google Review Link Generator

    The Google Review Link Generator by Whitespark solves a simple problem - how do you give your customers a URL to leave a Google review for your business? Reviews drive rankings, but Google doesn't easily provide this. This generator makes it easy.

    Get it: Google Review Link Generator

    26. Local Search Results Checker

    One of the hardest parts of Local SEO is figuring out rankings from any location — especially when Google stubbornly wants to serve results from the location you're in. BrightLocal solves this with a quick local ranking tool that can virtually drop you into any location on earth to check actual local rankings.

    Get it: Local Search Results Checker

    27. Moz Local Check Business Listing

    How consistent is your business information across the local search ecosystem? Moz Local lets you quickly check how your business shows up across the web in the major data aggregators that Google and others use to rank local search results. Very handy to understand your strengths and weaknesses. 

    Get it: Moz Local Check Business Listing


    Mobile SEO

    Tools to optimize your website in Google's mobile-first world.

    28. Mobile First Index Checker

    Mobile versions of websites often differ significantly from their desktop versions. Because Google has switched to mobile-first indexing, it's important that major elements (links, structured data, etc.) match on both versions. A number of tools will check this for you, but Zeo's is probably the most complete.

    Get it: Mobile First Index Checker

    29. Mobile SERP Test

    It's amazing how mobile search results can vary by both location AND device. MobileMoxie's mobile SERP test lets you compare devices side-by-side for any location, down to specific addresses.

    Get it: Mobile SERP Test

    30. Mobile-Friendly Test

    The gold standard for determining if your page meets Google's mobile-friendly requirements. If your page passes the test, then Google counts it as mobile friendly, which is a bonafide (albeit small) ranking factor. If your page isn't mobile-friendly, it will give you specific areas to address.

    Get it: Mobile-Friendly Test


    Multi-tool

    Free SEO tools that have so many functions, they have their own special category.

    31. Chrome DevTools

    The sheer number of SEO tasks you can perform—for free—with Chrome DevTools is simply staggering. From JavaScript auditing to speed to On-Page SEO, some of the best features are hidden away but totally awesome. Need some specific ways to use it for SEO? Check out these resources here, here, and here.

    Get it: Chrome DevTools

    32. Marketing Miner

    Marketing Miner has a low profile in the United States, but it's one of the best-kept secrets of Eastern Europe. If you need to pull a lot of SERP data, rankings, tool reports, or competitive analysis, Marketing Miner does the heavy lifting for you and loads it all into convenient reports. Check out this list of miners for possible ideas. It's a paid tool, but the free version allows to perform a number of tasks.

    Get it: Marketing Miner

    33. MozBar

    One of the original SEO toolbars, the MozBar has seen significant upgrades over the years. Log in with a free Moz account and get link metrics as you browse the web, perform on-page analysis, and SERP analysis. The free version is super-useful by itself, while Pro users get additional functionality like advanced keyword suggestions.

    Get it: MozBar

    34. SEMrush

    Like Moz, SEMrush offers a full suite of all-in-one SEO tools, and they have a free account option that works well if you only work with a single website, or only need a quick peek at top level data. The free account level gives you access to one "project" which includes basic site auditing, as well as limited keyword and domain reporting.

    Get it: SEMrush

    35. SEO Minion

    SEO Minion is a very popular Chrome extension that goes beyond most SEO toolbars. Some of the quick functions it performs include analyzing on-page SEO, check broken links, Hreflang checks, a SERP preview tool, and a nifty Google search location simulator. Definitely worth trying out.

    Get it: SEO Minion

    36. SEOquake

    Out of all the SEO toolbars available on the market, SEOquake is probably the most powerful, and comes with a plethora of configuration options — so you can configure it to adjust to your SEO needs. Aside from offering a boatload of data for every URL you visit, you can also perform basic on-page audits, compare domains, and export your data.

    Get it: SEOquake

    37. Sheets for Marketers

    Sheets for Marketers isn't a tool per se, but a website that contains over 100+ free templates to perform a huge number of tasks using Google Sheets. Find powerful free sheets for everything including competitive analysis, site audits, scraping, keyword research, and more. This is a website for your bookmarks. 

    Get it: Sheets for Marketers


    On-page SEO

    Tools to help you maximize your content potential at the page level.

    38. Natural Language API Demo

    While there is some debate over how actionable Google's Natural Language API is for SEO, there is no denying it's a cool tool with lots of advanced analysis. The free demo allows you to analyze the text of a single page at a time and lets you see how a search engine would view entities, sentiment analysis, syntax, and categorization.

    Get it: Natural Language API
    See also: Advanced SEO Strategies using Natural Language Processing

    39. Rich Results Test

    Did you implement review rating stars in your JSON-LD, and want to see if your markup is valid for Google's Rich Results? Getting a passing grade doesn't mean your page will automatically display rich results in the SERPs, but think of it as the cost of admission (the cost being free, of course.)

    Get it: Rich Results Test

    40. Structured Data Testing Tool

    Bookmark, bookmark, bookmark this page. Google's Structured Data Testing tool is essential for not only troubleshooting your own structured data but performing competitive analysis on your competitor's structured data as well. Pro Tip: You can edit the code within the tool to troubleshoot and arrive at valid code.

    Get it: Structured Data Testing Tool

    41. Tag Manager

    On the surface, Google Tag Manager serves a simple purpose of allowing you to inject "tags" (such as Google Analytics) into your HTML. Beyond that, advanced users can leverage Tag Manager for a host of SEO functions. While Google recommends against using Tag Manager to insert important elements like structured data, it remains useful for a ton of SEO-related activities.

    Get it: Tag Manager

    42. View Rendered Source

    This simple JavaScript auditing tool does one thing, and it does it very well. View Rendered Source is a free Chrome plugin that allows you to easily see the fully rendered DOM of any URL, and compare it to the original HTML. Great for JavaScript auditing and troubleshooting.

    Get it: View Rendered Source


    Research

    Cools free tools for competitive, historical, and technological analysis.

    43. BuzzSumo

    As an SEO research tool, BuzzSumo is awesome. Its Chrome extension is one of the few tools available that deliver reliable social share count estimates for any piece of content. You don't get as much data with a free account, but you still get access to top content and trending data. One of our favorite tools.

    Get it: BuzzSumo

    44. Hunter

    Hunter is a popular email search tool, and definitely the most popular free email finder. Use it to find the email address associated with any company or individual, and verify any email address you already have. 50 free queries/month before paid plans kick in. 

    Get it: Hunter
    Also popular: Viola Nobert

    45. SimilarWeb

    SimilarWeb is like competitor analysis on steroids. You can research your competitor's traffic, top pages, engagement, marketing channels, and more. The free offering is limited to five results per metric, but it's often enough to grab a quick data point.

    Get it: SimilarWeb

    46. Wappalyzer

    There are lots of tools that help you analyze what technology stacks a website runs on, but Wappalyzer is an SEO favorite. It's 100 percent free (unless you want advanced reporting) and will instantly tell you what technology a site is using. For example, are they using Yoast or All In One SEO Pack?

    Get it: Wappalyzer

    47. Wayback Machine

    Gotta be honest, I personally use the Wayback Machine 2–3 times a week. It's perfect for uncovering historical data. You can even find a trove of historical robots.txt files archived. There are a ton of other SEO uses for Wayback Machine you may find useful. 100 percent free.

    Get it: Wayback Machine


    Site Speed

    Tools to speed up your site in order to improve engagement, increase conversions, and rank higher.

    48. Cloudflare

    There are so many good things to say about Cloudflare, it's difficult to know what to include here. Aside from a free CDN to speed up your site, it also allows for easy DNS management, and 100 percent free DDoS protection. You can run on a paid plan forever, but if you're ready to upgrade, the pro features are super cool and amazingly affordable.

    Get it: Cloudflare

    49. GTmetrix

    GTmetrix is one of many webpage speed performance tests that SEOs love to use. It provides familiar reports such as PageSpeed, YSlow, and Waterfalls, as well as automatically visualizing historic data for each page it analyses.

    Get it: GTmetrix

    50. Lighthouse

    Lighthouse is Google's open-source speed performance tool. It's also the most up-to-date, especially in terms of analyzing the performance of mobile pages and PWAs. Google not only recommends using Lighthouse to evaluate your page performance, but there is also speculation they use very similar evaluations in their ranking algorithms. 

    Get it: Lighthouse

    51. Page Speed Insights

    Page Speed Insights is another Google tool built on top of Lighthouse, with one key added metric: Field Data. Field Data uses metrics collected by the Chrome User Experience Report so you can see how your page performs with real users across the globe. Not every page has data, but it's super useful when it does.

    Get it: Page Speed Insights

    52. SpeedMonitor.io

    If manually logging into a speed tool to check your performance each day isn't your thing, consider SpeedMonitor.io. It uses Lighthouse data to gauge performance, then tracks it over time and stores the results — all for free. You can even add competitor tracking and on-demand audits. 

    Get it: SpeedMonitor.io

    53. WebpageTest

    Webpage test is another performance tool similar to GTMetrix. It breaks down performance into easy-to-understand grades, along with some of the most detailed performance reports found anywhere. 

    Get it: WebpageTest


    Wordpress

    To be honest, there are literally hundreds of Wordpress plugins that can be helpful for SEO. You almost always want a "general" SEO plugin, and we've listed two below. For others, you have a lot of options, but this list from Kinsta is a good place to start.

    54. Rank Math

    The "new" kid on the Wordpress SEO plugin block, RankMath is quickly earning a cult following among certain SEO pros. It's fully functional and comes with some cool features like built-in redirection, which means needing to install fewer plugins or pay for upgrades. Worth checking out.

    Get it: Rank Math

    55. Yoast SEO

    Yoast is the "name" in Wordpress SEO. The most trusted name, the most installed (30 million sites) and often, the most innovative. With the help of our friend Jono Alderson, they've created some amazing advances in the delivery of structured data. I personally use Yoast on most of my Wordpress sites, and they are obviously highly recommended.

    Get it: Yoast SEO


    Bonus: Free Google Sheet of All 55 Tools

    We've included a Google Sheet containing all 55 tools listed above. You can make a copy of the sheet and file away for your personal use, or share with your team.

    Get the Free SEO Tool Sheet

    Special Thanks

    A lot of smart SEOs deserve credit for helping out with the recommendations in this post. A number of folks contributed suggestions from Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit.

    A comprehensive list of SEO tools and resources is maintained by Saijo George. It's continually updated and well maintained. You can find it here.

    p.s. While these are 55 of the best free SEO tools, it's by no means a complete list! What are some of your favorite free SEO tools? Let us know in the comments.


    Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!

  • Jun 7, 2019 12:07:00 AM

    Posted by Cyrus-Shepard

    We're bringing back an oldie but a goodie this Friday! In today's highly popular throwback, Cyrus Shepard calls out seven super-easy and timeless hacks to keep your title tags clickable in the SERPs. Check them out and share your own with us in the comments below!

    Title tag hacks for increased rankings and traffics

    Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high-resolution version in a new tab!

    Video Transcription

    Howdy, Moz fans. Welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. I'm very excited to be here today. My name is Cyrus. I'm a Moz associate. Today I want to talk you about title tags, specifically title tag hacks to increase your traffic and rankings.

    Now, you may be asking yourself, "Are title tags even still important today in SEO?" You bet they are. We've done a lot of correlation studies in the past. Those correlation studies have shown different things sort of decreasing in the past years. But we've also seen a lot of experiments recently where people have changed their title tag and seen a significant, measurable increase in their rankings.

    Now, the other aspect of title tags that people sometimes forget about is the click-through rate that you get, which can measurably increase your traffic if you get the title tag right. Now, what's neat about increasing your traffic through click-through rate is we've seen a lot of experiments, Rand has experimented a lot, that if you can increase this, you can measurably increase this.

    Traffic through increased clicks can seem to increase your rankings under certain circumstances. So you get the dual benefit. So that's what I want to talk to you about today — increasing those rankings, increasing that traffic by changing the first thing that your visitor is going to see in the SERPs.

    So the important thing to remember is that these are things to experiment with. Not all of these hacks are going to work for you. SEO is founded in best practices, but true success is founded when you experiment and try different things. So try some of these out and these will give you an idea of where to get started in some of your title tag experiments.

    1. Numbers

    Numbers kind of pop out at you. These are examples: "5 Signs of a Zombie Apocalypse" or "How Mutants Can Save 22% on Car Insurance."

    • Cognitive Bias - Standout specific – When you see these in SERPs, they tend to get a slightly higher click-through rate sometimes. This works because of a cognitive bias. Our brains are trained to find things that stand out and are specific. When you're scanning search results, that's a lot of information. So your brain is going to try to find some things that it can grasp on to, and numbers are the ultimate things that are both specific and they stand out. So sometimes, in certain circumstances, you can get a higher click-through rate by using numbers in your title tags.

    2. Dates

    Rand did an excellent Whiteboard Friday a few weeks ago, we'll link to it below. These are things like "Best Actress Oscar Nominee 2017" or even more specific, you can get the month in there, "Top NFL Fantasy Draft Picks September 2017."

    Now, Rand talks about this a lot. He talks about ways of finding dates in your keyword research. The key in that research is when you're using tools like Keyword Explorer or Google AdWords or SEMrush, you have to look for previous years. So if I was searching for this year's, we don't have enough data yet for 2017, so I would look for "Best Actress Oscar Nominee 2016."

    • Leverage your CMS – If you use WordPress, if you use Yoast plugin, you can actually have your title tags update automatically year-to-year or even month-to-month leveraging that. It's not right for all circumstances, but for certain keyword queries it works pretty well.

    3. Length

    This is one of the most controversial, something that causes the most angst in SEO is when we're doing audits or looking at title tags. Inevitably, when you're doing an SEO audit, you find two things. You find title tags that are way too short, "Pantsuit," or title tags that are way, way, way too long because they just want to stuff every keyword in there, "Tahiti ASL Red Pantsuit with Line Color, Midrise Belt, Hook-eye Zipper, Herringbone Knit at Macy's."

    Now, these two, they're great title tags, but there are two problems with this. This is way too broad. "Pantsuit" could be anything. This title tag is way too diluted. It's hard to really know what that is about. You're trying to scan it. You're trying to read it. Search engines are going to look at it the same way. Is this about a pantsuit? Is it about herringbone knit? It's kind of hard.

    • Etsy study – So Etsy recently did a study where Etsy measured hundreds of thousands of URLs and they shortened their title tags, because, more often than not, the longer title tag is a problem. Shorter title tags, not so much. You see longer title tags in the wild more often. When they shortened the title tags, they saw a measurable increase in rankings.
    • 50–60 Characters – This is one of those things where best practices usually is the best way to go because the optimal length is usually 50 to 60 characters.
    • Use top keywords – When you're deciding what keywords to put it when you're shortening this, that's where you want to use your keyword research and find the keywords that your visitors are actually using.

    So if I go into my Analytics or Google Search Console, I can see that people are actually searching for "pantsuit," "Macy's," and maybe something like that. I can come up with a title tag that fits within those parameters, "Tahiti ASL Red Pantsuit," "pantsuits" the category, "Macy's." That's going to be your winning title tag and you'll probably see an increase in rankings.

    4. Synonyms and variants

    Now, you'll notice in this last title tag, the category was a plural of pantsuit. That can actually help in some circumstances. But it's important to realize that how you think your searchers are searching may not be how they're actually searching.

    Let's say you do your keyword research and your top keywords are "cheap taxis." You want to optimize for cheap taxis. Well, people may be looking for that in different ways. They may be looking for "affordable cabs" or "low cost" or "cheap Ubers," things like that.

    So you want to use those variants, find out what the synonyms and variants are and incorporate those into your title tag. So my title tag might be "Fast Affordable Cabs, Quick Taxi, Your Cheap Ride." That's optimized for like three different things within that 50 to 60 word limit, and it's going to hit all those variants and you can actually rank a little higher for using that.

    • Use SERPs/keyword tools – The way you find these synonyms and variants, you can certainly look in the SERPs. Type your keyword into the SERPs, into Google and see what they highlight bold in the search results. That will often give you the variants that people are looking for, that people also ask at the bottom of the page. Your favorite keyword tool, such as Keyword Explorer or SEMrush or whatever you choose and also your Analytics. Google Search Console is a great source of information for these synonyms and variants.

    5. Call to action

    Now, you won't often find the call-to-action words in your keyword research, but they really help people click. These are action verbs.

    • Action wordsbuy, find download, search, listen, watch, learn, and access. When you use these, they give a little bit more excitement because they indicate that the user will be able to do something beyond the keyword. So they're not necessarily typing it in the search box. When they see it in results, it can create, "Oh wow, I get to download something." It provides a little something extra, and you can increase your click-through rates that way.

    6. Top referring keywords

    This is a little overlooked, and it's sort of an advanced concept. Oftentimes we optimize our page for one set of keywords, but the traffic that comes to it is another set of keywords. But what's very powerful is when people type their words into the search box and they see those exact same words in the title tags, that's going to increase your click-through rate.

    For an example, I went into the analytics here at Moz and I looked at Followerwonk. I found the top referring keywords in Google Search Console are "Twitter search," "search Twitter bios," and "Twitter analytics." Those are how people or what people are looking for right before they click on the Followerwonk listing in Google.

    So using that information, I might write a title tag like "Search Twitter Bios with Followerwonk, the Twitter Analytics Tool." That's a pretty good title tag. I'm kind of proud of that. But you can see it hits all my major keywords that people are using. So when I type in "Twitter analytics" into the search box and I see "The Twitter Analytics Tool," I'm more likely to click on that.

    So I've written about this before, but it's very important to optimize your page, not only for the traffic you're trying to get, but the traffic you're actually receiving. When you can marry those two, you can be stronger in all aspects.

    7. Questions

    Questions are great tools to use in your title tags. These are things like, "Where Do Butterflies Migrate?" Maybe your keyword is just "butterflies migrate." But by asking a question, you create a curiosity gap, and you give people an incentive to click. Or "What is PageRank?" That's something we do here at Moz. So you get the curiosity gap.

    But oftentimes, by asking a question, you get the bonus of winning a featured snippet. Britney Muller wrote an awesome, awesome post about this a while back about questions people also ask, how to find those in your keyword research and claim those featured snippets and claim "people also ask" boxes. It's a great, great way to increase your traffic.

    So these are seven tips. Let us know your tips for title tags in the comments below. If you like this video, I'd appreciate a thumbs up. Share it with your friends on social media. I'll see you next time. Thanks, everybody.

    Video transcription by Speechpad.com


    If you liked these 7 title tag tips, you'll love MozCon — it's three days chock full of SEO goodness in the same vein. Cyrus himself will be emceeing the event, and all the industry greats you know and love will be sharing their best advice on stage. Check out the agenda and grab your tickets now — we sell out every year!

    Save my seat at MozCon


    Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!

  • Jun 6, 2019 2:11:02 PM

    Posted by cheryldraper

    If you can believe it, we’re only about a month away from MozCon 2019! July 15th can’t come soon enough, am I right?!

    In March, we announced the initial agenda and in May we announced our community speakers. Today, we’re excited to bring you our final agenda — a fully loaded list of all the knowledge you can expect to gain from this year's conference. 

    Haven't snagged your ticket yet? Don't worry — we still have some left!:

    I'm going to MozCon!

    With the schedule set and the speakers hard at work polishing their presentations, here’s a look at the three action-packed days we have planned for you.


    Monday, July 15th


    7:30am–9:00am

    Breakfast & registration


    9:00am–9:20am

    Welcome to MozCon 2019!

    Sarah Bird, CEO of Moz

    Our vivacious CEO will be kicking things off early on the first day of MozCon with a warm welcome, laying out all the pertinent details of the conference, and getting us in the right mindset for three days of learning.


    9:20am–10:00am

    Web Search 2019: The Essential Data Marketers Need

    Rand Fishkin, Sparktoro

    It's been a rough couple years in search. Google's domination and need for additional growth has turned the search giant into a competitor for more and more publishers, and plateaued the longstanding trend of Google's growing referral traffic. But in the midst of this turmoil, opportunities have emerged, too. In this presentation, Rand will look not only at how Google (and Amazon, YouTube, Instagram, and others) have leveraged their monopoly power in concerning ways, but also how to find opportunities for traffic, branding, and marketing success.


    10:00am–10:30am

    Human > Machine > Human: Understanding Human-Readable Quality Signals and Their Machine-Readable Equivalents

    Ruth Burr Reedy, UpBuild

    The push and pull of making decisions for searchers versus search engines is an ever-present SEO conundrum. How do you tackle industry changes through the lens of whether something is good for humans or for machines? Ruth will take us through human-readable quality signals and their machine-readable equivalents and how to make SEO decisions accordingly, as well as how to communicate change to clients and bosses.


    10:35am–11:15am

    Morning break



    11:15am–11:45am

    Improved Reporting & Analytics Within Google Tools

    Dana DiTomaso, Kick Point

    Covering the intersections between some of our favorite free tools — Google Data Studio, Google Analytics, and Google Tag Manager — Dana will be deep-diving into how to improve your reporting and analytics, even providing downloadable Data Studio templates along the way.


    11:45am–12:15pm

    Local SERP Analytics: The Challenges and Opportunities

    Rob Bucci, Moz

    We all know that SERPs are becoming increasingly local. Google is more and more looking to satisfy local intent queries for searchers. There's a treasure-trove of data in local SERPs that SEOs can use to outrank their competitors. In this session, Rob will talk about the challenges that come with trying to do SERP analytics at a local level and the opportunities that await those who can overcome those challenges.


    12:20pm–1:50pm

    Lunch


    1:50pm–2:20pm

    Keywords Aren't Enough: How to Uncover Content Ideas Worth Chasing

    Ross Simmonds, Foundation Marketing

    Many marketers focus solely on keyword research when crafting their content, but it just isn't enough if you want to gain a competitive edge. Ross will share a framework for uncovering content ideas leveraged from forums, communities, niche sites, good old-fashioned SERP analysis, tools and techniques to help along the way, and exclusive research surrounding the data that backs this up.


    2:20pm–2:50pm

    How to Supercharge Link Building with a Digital PR Newsroom

    Shannon McGuirk, Aira Digital

    Everyone who’s ever tried their hand at link building knows how much effort it demands. If only there was a way to keep a steady stream of quality links coming in the door for clients, right? In this talk, Shannon will share how to set up a "digital PR newsroom" in-house or agency-side that supports and grows your link building efforts. Get your note-taking hand ready, because she’s going to outline her process and provide a replicable tutorial for how to make it happen.


    2:55pm–3:35pm

    Afternoon break


    3:35pm–4:05pm

    From Zero to Local Ranking Hero

    Darren Shaw, Whitespark

    From zero web presence to ranking hyper-locally, Darren will take us along on the 8-month-long journey of a business growing its digital footprint and analyzing what worked (and didn’t) along the way. How well will they rank from a GMB listing alone? What about when citations were added, and later indexed? Did having a keyword in the business name help or harm, and what changes when they earn a few good links? Buckle up for this wild ride as we discover exactly what impact different strategies have on local rankings.


    4:05pm–4:45pm

    Esse Quam Videri: When Faking It Is Harder than Making It

    Russ Jones, Moz

    Covering a breadth of SEO topics, Russ will show us how the correct use of available tools makes it easier to actually be the best in your market rather than try to cut corners and fake it. If you're a fan of hacks and shortcuts, come prepared to have your mind changed.


    7:00–10:00 pm

    Monday Night Welcome Party

    Join us for a backyard tiki bar party at beautiful Block 41 in Belltown. Meet with fellow marketers over drinks, music, and catching sun on the patio. We look forward to bringing our community together to inaugurate MozCon on this special night. See you there!


    Tuesday, July 16th


    8:30am–9:30am

    Breakfast


    9:30am–10:00am

    Building a Discoverability Powerhouse: Lessons from Merging an Organic, Paid, & Content Practice

    Heather Physioc, VMLY&R

    Search is a channel that can’t live in a silo. In order to be its most effective, search teams have to collaborate successfully across paid, organic, content and more. Get tips for integrating and collaborating from the hard knocks and learnings of merging an organic, paid and performance content team into one Discoverability group. Find out how we went from three teams of individual experts to one integrated Discoverability powerhouse, and learn from our mistakes and wins as you apply the principles in your own company.


    10:00am–10:30am

    Brand Is King: How to Rule in the New Era of Local Search

    Mary Bowling, Ignitor Digital

    Get ready for a healthy dose of all things local with this talk! Mary will deep-dive into how the Google Local algorithm has matured in 2019 and how marketers need to mature with it; how the major elements of the algo (relevance, prominence, and proximity) influence local rankings and how they affect each other; how local results are query-dependent; how to feed business info into the Knowledge Graph; and how brand is now "king" in local search.


    10:35am–11:15am

    Morning break


    11:15am–11:45am

    Making Memories: Creating Content People Remember

    Casie Gillette, KoMarketing

    We know that only 20% of people remember what they read, but 80% remember what they saw. How do you create something people actually remember? You have to think beyond words and consider factors like images, colors, movement, location, and more. In this talk, Casie will dissect what brands are currently doing to capture attention and how everyone, regardless of budget or resources, can create the kind of content their audience will actually remember.


    11:45am–12:25pm

    20 Years in Search & I Don't Trust My Gut or Google

    Wil Reynolds, Seer Interactive

    What would your reaction be if you were told that one of Wil's clients got more conversions from zero-volume search terms than search terms with 1000+ searches per month? It's true. Wil found this out in seconds, leading him to really look at his whole client strategy through a new lens. It also made him question company-wide strategies. How prevalent is this across all clients? Don't they all deserve to get these insights? It required him to dig into the long tail, deep. To use big data and see PPC data as insights, not just marketing.

    What would your reaction be if you were told that Google's "bad click" business could be generating as much annually as Starbucks or McDonalds?

    Wil will be making the case for big data, agencies, and why building systems that looking at every single search term you get matched to is the future of search marketing.


    12:30pm–2:00pm

    Lunch


    2:00pm–2:15pm

    Super-Practical Tips for Improving Your Site's E-A-T

    Marie Haynes, Marie Haynes Consulting Inc.

    Google has admitted that they measure the concept of "Expertise, Authoritativeness, and Trustworthiness" in their algorithms. If your site is categorized under YMYL (Your Money or Your Life), you absolutely must have good E-A-T in order to rank well. In this talk, you'll learn how Google measures E-A-T and what changes you can make both on site and off in order to outrank your competitors. Using real-life examples, Marie will answer what E-A-T is and how Google measures it, what changes you can make on your site to improve how E-A-T is displayed, and what you can do off-site to improve E-A-T.


    2:15pm–2:30pm

    Fixing the Indexability Challenge: A Data-Based Framework

    Areej AbuAli, Verve Search

    How do you turn an unwieldy 2.5 million-URL website into a manageable and indexable site of just 20,000 pages? Areej will share the methodology and takeaways used to restructure a job aggregator site which, like many large websites, had huge problems with indexability and the rules used to direct robot crawl. This talk will tackle tough crawling and indexing issues, diving into the case study with flow charts to explain the full approach and how to implement it.


    2:30pm–2:45pm

    What Voice Means for Search Marketers: Top Findings from the 2019 Report

    Christi Olson, Microsoft

    How can search marketers take advantage of the strengths and weaknesses of today's voice assistants? Diving into three scenarios for informational, navigational, and transactional queries, Christi will share how to use language semantics for better content creation and paid targeting, how to optimize existing content to be voice-friendly (including the new voice schema markup!), and what to expect from future algorithm updates as they adapt to assistants that read responses aloud, no screen required. Highlighting takeaways around voice commerce from the report, this talk will ultimately provide a breakdown on how search marketers can begin to adapt their shopping experience for v-commerce.


    2:50pm–3:30pm

    Afternoon break


    3:30pm–4:00pm

    Redefining Technical SEO

    Paul Shapiro, Catalyst

    It’s time to throw the traditional definition of technical SEO out the window. Why? Because technical SEO is much, much bigger than just crawling, indexing, and rendering. Technical SEO is applicable to all areas of SEO, including content development and other creative functions. In this session, you’ll learn how to integrate technical SEO into all aspects of your SEO program.


    4:00pm–4:40pm

    How Many Words Is a Question Worth?

    Dr. Peter J. Meyers, Moz

    Traditional keyword research is poorly suited to Google's quest for answers. One question might represent thousands of keyword variants, so how do we find the best questions, craft content around them, and evaluate success? Dr. Pete dives into three case studies to answer these questions.


    Wednesday, July 17th


    8:30am–9:30am

    Breakfast


    9:30am–10:10am

    Fraggles, Mobile-First Indexing, & the SERP of the Future

    Cindy Krum, Mobile Moxie

    Before you ask: no, this isn’t Fraggle Rock, MozCon edition! Cindy will cover the myriad ways mobile-first indexing is changing the SERPs, including progressive web apps, entity-first indexing, and how "fraggles" are indexed in the Knowledge Graph and what it all means for the future of mobile SERPs.


    10:10am–10:40am

    Killer CRO and UX Wins Using an SEO Crawler

    Luke Carthy, Excel Networking

    CRO, UX, and an SEO crawler? You read that right! Luke will share actionable tips on how to identify revenue wins and impactful low-hanging fruit to increase conversions and improve UX with the help of a site crawler typically used for SEO, as well as a generous helping of data points from case studies and real-world examples.


    10:45am–11:25am

    Morning break


    11:25am–11:55am

    Content, Rankings, and Lead Generation: A Breakdown of the 1% Content Strategy

    Andy Crestodina, Orbit Media

    How can you use data to find and update content for higher rankings and more traffic? Andy will take us through a four-point presentation that pulls together the most effective tactics around content into a single high-powered content strategy with even better results.


    11:55am–12:25pm

    Running Your Own SEO Tests: Why It Matters & How to Do It Right

    Rob Ousbey, Distilled

    Google's algorithms have undergone significant changes in recent years. Traditional ranking signals don't hold the same sway they used to, and they're being usurped by factors like UX and brand that are becoming more important than ever before. What's an SEO to do?

    The answer lies in testing.

    Sharing original data and results from clients, Rob will highlight the necessity of testing, learning, and iterating your work, from traditional UX testing to weighing the impact of technical SEO changes, tweaking on-page elements, and changing up content on key pages. Actionable processes and real-world results abound in this thoughtful presentation on why you should be testing SEO changes, how and where to run them, and what kinds of tests you ought to consider for your circumstances.


    12:30pm–2:00pm

    Lunch


    2:00pm–2:15pm

    Dark Helmet's Guide to Local Domination with Google Posts and Q&A

    Greg Gifford, Wikimotive

    Google Posts and Questions & Answers are two incredibly powerful features of Google My Business, yet most people don't even know they exist. Greg will walk through Google Posts in detail, sharing how they work, how to use them, and tips for optimization based on testing with hundreds of clients. He'll also cover the Q&A section of GMB (a feature that lets anyone in the community speak for your business), share the results of a research project covering hundreds of clients, share some hilarious examples of Q&A run wild, and explain exactly how to use Q&A the right way to win more local business.


    2:15pm–2:30pm

    How to Audit for Inclusive Content

    Emily Triplett Lentz, Help Scout

    Digital marketers have a responsibility to learn to spot the biases that frequently find their way into online copy, replacing them with alternatives that lead to stronger, clearer messaging and that cultivate wider, more loyal and enthusiastic audiences. Last year, Help Scout audited several years of content for unintentionally exclusionary language that associated physical disabilities or mental illness with negative-sounding terms, resulting in improved writing clarity and a stronger brand. You'll learn what inclusive content is, how it helps to engage a larger and more loyal audience, how to conduct an audit of potentially problematic language on a site, and how to optimize for inclusive, welcoming language.


    2:30pm–2:45pm

    Get the Look: Improve the Shopper Experience with Image and Visual Search Optimization

    Joelle Irvine, Bookmark Content

    With voice, local, and rich results only rising in importance, how do image and visual search fit into the online shopping ecosystem? Using examples from Google Images, Google Lens, and Pinterest Lens, Joelle will show how image optimization can improve the overall customer experience and play a key role in discoverability, product evaluation, and purchase decisions for online shoppers. At the same time, accepting that image recognition technology is not yet perfect, she will also share actionable tactics to better optimize for visual search to help those shoppers find that perfect style they just can’t put into words.


    2:50pm–3:30pm

    Afternoon break


    3:30pm–4:00pm

    Factors that Affect the Local Algorithm that Don't Impact Organic

    Joy Hawkins, Sterling Sky Inc.

    Google’s local algorithm is a horse of a different color when compared with the organic algo most SEOs are familiar with. Joy will share results from a SterlingSky study on how proximity varies greatly when comparing local and organic results, how reviews impact ranking (complete with data points from testing), how spam is running wild (and how it negatively impacts real businesses), and more.


    4:00pm–4:30pm

    Featured Snippets: Essentials to Know & How to Target

    Britney Muller, Moz

    By now, most SEOs are comfortable with the idea of featured snippets, but actually understanding and capturing them in the changing search landscape remains elusive. Britney will share some eye-opening data about the SERPs you know and love while equipping you with a bevy of new tricks for winning featured snippets into your toolbox.


    7:00pm–10:00pm

    Wednesday Night Bash

    Bowling: check! Karaoke: check! Photo booth: check! Join us for one last hurrah as we take over the Garage. You won't want to miss this closing night bash — we'll have plenty of games, food, and fun as we mix and mingle, say "see ya soon" to friends new and old, and reminisce over our favorite lessons from the past 3 days.


    See you there?

    It’s not too late to sign up for MozCon 2019! We sell out every year, but we've still got tickets left for you to scoop up.

    Grab my MozCon ticket now!

    As much as we’d love to see you all there, we know that a trip to Seattle isn’t always feasible. If that’s the case for you, be on the lookout for the video bundle we’ll have available for purchase after the conference — get all the great insights from MozCon from the comfort of your home or office, and share them with your whole team!

    Have questions? Pop them in the comments or head on over to our MozCon resource center where you can view FAQs, learn about our speakers, and get travel information. Once you buy your ticket, be sure to request access to our MozCon Facebook Group for enhanced networking with your fellow attendees!

    Let the final countdown to MozCon 2019 begin!


    Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!

  • Jun 5, 2019 9:00:00 AM

    Posted by MiriamEllis

    When customers walk into your place of business, phone you, or reach out to you via email or social media with a question that’s clearly a lead, you’d never, ever answer:

    “Who knows?”

    But it’s exactly this, and several related scenarios of absurdity, that have resulted from Google positioning itself as the dominant middle man between customers and local brands while failing to adequately communicate or enforce product policies.

    Examples of Google Business Profiles gone bad are often comical, but it’s no laughing matter for your business to shed revenue for the sake of some jester’s joke. Then, spammers jump into the game, and that’s about as humorous as hitting your funny bone. And, sometimes, it’s even somebody on your own staff or a marketer you’ve hired who goofs.

    Good local companies work so hard to develop exceptional customer service and a sterling reputation, and the Google Business Profile can brilliantly showcase both when carefully curated. But lack of vigilance over five key sections of this most visible online asset can cumulatively undermine offline goals.

    Today, let’s look at some serious gaffes, get you set up to mitigate them, and put a watchdog mindset in your local place of business.

    Naming nonsense

    One of my favorite Local Tech Leads at Moz, Robert Reis, recently pointed out to me that Google’s sternest local guidelines actually reveal their greatest vulnerabilities. This is certainly true when it comes to Google not wanting brands to keyword stuff business names, because it so clearly appears to impact local pack rankings. Take a look at this all-too-common tomfoolery:

    Credit: @DarrenShaw_

    Then, there are other cases in which a business listing can be maliciously edited or hijacked by a competitor, an angry customer, or another third party. In this example, not only has the business name been edited, but the website URL has been pointed to ripoffreport.com:

    Credit: @keyserholiday

    What to do:

    Customers may laugh, but certainly, they will not trust business names like these. If someone in your own company has been keyword stuffing, show them Google’s explicit guidelines regarding formatting names to match real-world business titles and edit the name to conform to the rules. Any other course risks losing customers and being reported by the public to Google for a violation.

    If you suspect that a competitor’s high rankings are stemming, at least in part, from keyword stuffing, do a little research. Look at the name on their street signage in Google Street View. Take a photo in person if necessary. Look at the name on their website. Phone them to see how they answer the phone. Then, if you’re convinced that the guidelines are being broken, submit your evidence via the Business Redressal Complaint Form. There is no guarantee that Google will act on your report, but this is the main vehicle for seeking action.

    If your listing has been hijacked and maliciously edited, I recommend starting by reporting the full details at the Google My Business Help Community. Ask the volunteers there to give you current steps for resolving the hijack. You can’t ever be totally safe from the possibility of hijacking, but do be sure you’ve claimed any GMB listing for your company. Some local SEOs also recommend making occasional null edits (hitting the submit button in your GMB dashboard without changing any of the listing data) as this activity might make your listing less prone to third-party edits.

    Review roguery

    I like to give business owners the benefit of the doubt for making a judgment call error when they review themselves. But it’s always embarrassing to see any company misusing reviews to sing their own praises, and particularly so when their family members point this out in public:

    Credit: @ordacowski

    More often, the business is the victim of review shenanigans. Google’s forum is continuously emitting distress signals from business owners who feel they’ve received one or more negative reviews from people they’ve never had a transaction with, as illustrated by this interchange:

    And, the hard truth is that some entities have made a business model out of competitive sabotage via negative reviews. The problem has become large enough to make televised news.

    What to do:

    Falsifying reviews is illegal and has resulted in multi-million-dollar FTC fines in the United States. If you own or market local businesses, adhere to the Consumer Review Fairness Act and read the guidelines of any online platform on which you are receiving or writing reviews. Don’t review your own business or have past or present staff do so. Don’t review your competitors. Don’t incentivize reviews in any way, or post reviews on behalf of anyone else. Don’t hire any marketing firm or use any review management software that violates guidelines.

    If your business becomes the subject of a review spam attack, screenshot and document all of the fake reviews, then flag them from inside of your Google My Business dashboard via the three little dots associated with each review. After three days, contact Google through their online chat option to follow up.

    Google will make the ultimate decision on whether to remove the reviews and they are quite strict about what they view as negative vs. fake. If Google doesn’t remove the reviews, I would suggest two things. First, I would report the reviews to ReviewFraud and then, if the sentiment in the reviews is damaging enough, you might need to contact an attorney to see if further steps can be taken to prompt removal.

    If you suspect a competitor is trying to boost their own rankings with review spam, document what you see and report it via the Google My Business Help Community.

    Fatuous photos

    “I cannot for the life of me believe that you would allow a normal user to upload photos to my business listing without my approval and you do not give THE OWNER OF THE PAGE the ability to delete them!” - from Google’s Forum.

    The above quote typifies the frustration business owners feel regarding yet another element of their Google listing that is open to public contributions. Brands often think of these listings as belonging to them, when, in fact, they belong to Google. Images are considered to be a strong factor in CTR, so it’s particularly aggravating when user-uploaded photos either misrepresent or embarrass the business.

    I’ve been shown cases in which people have mysteriously uploaded images that have nothing to do with a business. More often, though, I see photos like the following which highlight some aspect of the company that has disgusted or angered customers:

    When something goes wrong with photos, like a bug on Google’s end, failure to size images correctly, or possibly the owner removing images that were previously there, this public warning symbol is definitely not a good look:

    Google can also pull random images from website pages into your profile, resulting in your business being represented by something like … melted ice cream?

    Credit: @tomwaddington8

    Claire Carlisle recently documented Google’s penchant for pointing European users to Google Image Search instead of the photo section of listings. There is some reason to suspect this may happen in the US in the future, which could result in all kinds of strange optics popping up in association with brands.

    What to do:

    If an image accurately represents a lack of proper management at a location of your business, fix the issue or such imagery will continue to surface. You can then try flagging the photo, identifying yourself as the business owner, and explaining what you’ve done to correct the problem. However, unless the photo violates Google’s guidelines, it’s unlikely to be removed. Barring removal, be sure you are adding as many high-quality photos as possible to your listing to lessen the impact of a single image.

    If the image violates Google’s guidelines, click on the name of the person who uploaded it and copy their profile URL. Then, report the user via the Google My Business Help Community, requesting that the profile be removed for failing to adhere to the guidelines.

    If you see something like the warning symbol appearing instead of a photo you’ve tried to upload, check the above forum for reports of known bugs. You can always remove your own photos via the trash can symbol in your Google My Business dashboard.

    Hours of inconvenience

    “This is not a sustainable way to treat a business or customers.” - A reviewer experiencing unmanaged hours of operation

    When customers feel that it’s your business playing a joke on them, they’re unlikely to return. This collage of 1-star reviews captures the collateral damage of neglecting to properly manage hours of operation on the web:

    What to do:

    A consistent theme in these damaging reviews is that customers are checking multiple places on the web to be sure an establishment is open on a given day. We’ve all come to depend on websites and business listings to provide this information, and it’s truly inconvenient when these assets mislead us. Few businesses can afford to let multiple customers down and no business can survive customers sensing they’ve been tricked!

    The good news is that the fix for this is quite simple. Google’s tutorial for setting special hours if foolproof, and it will only take you a few minutes each year to ensure your profile displays correct information every day of the year. And, of course, update your website to reflect this data, too.

    There are no dumb questions, but…

    Sorry to say it, but there are actually some answers that are far from smart. I’ve saved for last the most extreme example of real-world businesses becoming the butt of online jokes.

    Google Q&A is beginning to have all the earmarks of an experiment gone astray, and if you’re not actively managing this feature of the Google Business Profile, chances are good that your customers are experiencing a bizarre substitute for customer service.

    Brace yourself for this collage:

    What to do:

    A quick study of the public responses to real consumer questions shows the state of total confusion surrounding this GBP feature. For example, one customer has mistaken it for a “discussion board” not associated with the business; this is incorrect. Others are proclaiming that they aren’t associated with the brand and don’t want to “lead people”, despite responding. Still, others are steering potential patrons away from the brand to a competitor (yikes!).

    But, predominantly, we have wags replying to questions without having any information to share. “IDK” and “Why don’t you call them yourself?” typify this ridiculous behavior. Why would anyone waste time doing this, you might ask? We can put it down to two things: the old adage about idle hands and Google’s still-new program of perks for participation. Note how many of the individuals in our collage have achieved Local Guide status for giving out these useless answers. Raise your hands if you’re not impressed.

    But now, put your hands back on your keyboard for a little work. Unlike the review medium in which guidelines forbid you being an initiator, Google Questions & Answers invites businesses to post and answer their own FAQs. All you have to do is spend a few minutes populating this area of the Google Business Profile with common questions and responses. Then monitor this feature on an ongoing basis so that customers are receiving a helpful, authoritative response to questions. Q&A is a lead-generating asset and conversions are totally within your control.

    Adopting a local watchdog

    

    All five cases of Google Business Profile hijinx share the requirement of vigilance for prevention and mitigation. Manually checking on multiple features week after week is a serious drain on local business owners’ limited time. Businesses with multiple locations are especially prone to becoming distracted from or worn out by the effort.

    Putting a devoted watchdog between pranksters, spammers, and your vital Google listings is the smartest thing you can do to maintain them as an influential source of truth about your brand.

    Adopt the new and improved Moz Local at your place of business and feel secure knowing:

    • If a third party edits your business name, our software will recognize the change and override it with the authoritative data you’ve provided.
    • Moz Local continuously alerts you to incoming Google reviews so that you can catch any emerging reputation problems quickly and respond to them.
    • You’ll be alerted every time a user-uploaded photo gets added to your Google listing. This is tracked in a continuous feed in your dashboard, and you can even set up email alerts if that’s easier for you. Either way, you’ll be the first to know if someone is uploading images that violate Google’s guidelines.
    • You aren’t disappointing customers anymore with inaccurate hours, because you can set them up well in advance in the Moz Local dashboard. We recommend setting special hours at least 7 days in advance of a known closure.
    • You’ll see all incoming Q&A queries in a continuous dashboard feed, facilitating fast, authoritative responses from your business instead of “IDK”s from random users.

    Moz Local is the faithful companion you’re seeking to ensure you’re publishing trustworthy business data, taking maximum control of your online reputation, and maintaining a high level of spam awareness, all in an intuitive, organized dashboard.

    Everybody likes a good joke, but your Google Business Profile isn’t the place for one! Ready to put a serious watchdog at your place of business? Learn more about the new Moz Local!


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